Handbook of Confucianism in Modern Japan Table of Contents

Introduction
 

  1. Reinterpreting Matsumiya Kanzan: On the Interval between State Shinto and the Idea of the Three Religions.Song Qi (Translated by Ruth and John McCreery)

  2. The Confucian Classics in the Political Thought of Sakuma Shōzan. Han Shuting (Translated by Ruth and John McCreery)

  3. The Confucian Traits Featuring in the Meiroku Zasshi. Lee Yu-Ting

  4. The Invention of “Chinese Philosophy”— How Did the Classics Take Root in Japan's First Modern University? Mizuno Hirota (Translated by Ruth and John McCreery)

  5. Inoue Tetsujirō and Modern Yangming Learning in Japan. Yamamura Shō (Translated by Ruth and John McCreery)

  6. Kokumin Dōtoku for Women: Shimoda Utako in the Taishō Era. Masako N. Racel

  7. Modern Contextual Turns from “The Kingly Way” to “The Imperial Way”. Chang Kun-chiang (Translated by Ruth and John McCreery)

  8. The Discourse on Imperial Way Confucian Thought: The Link between Daitō Bunka Gakuin and Chosŏn Gyunghakwon. Kang Haesoo (Translated by Ruth and John McCreery)

  9. The Image of the Kingly Way during the War: Focusing on Takada Shinji’s Imperial Way Discourse. Park Junhyun (Translated by Ruth and John McCreery)

  10. Watsuji Tetsurō’s Confucian Bonds: From Totalitarianism to New Confucianism. Kyle Michael James Shuttleworth 

  11. Thinking about Confucianism and Modernity in the Early Postwar Period: Watsuji Tetsurō’s The History of Ethical Thought in Japan. Alexandra Mustătea

  12. Yasuoka Masahiro and the Survival of Confucianism in Postwar Japan, 1945-1983. Eddy Dufourmont 

  13. Universalizing “Kingly Way” Confucianism: A Japanese Legacy and Chinese Future? Jiang Dongxian and Shaun O’Dwyer

 

Glossary

 

Index
 

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